American Academy

A 2007 study found that the use of a car seat rear-facing for children under two years of age decreased their risk of serious injury or death in a 75 percent.Other recommendations include the use of a forward-oriented seat with harness for children of eight years, or until the child reaches the maximum height and the restriction of weight for the seat which is used. The use of a safety harness provides more protection than a booster seat, although booster seats offer better protection to children than the use of the safety belt. The use of a booster seat is recommended until the children reach the height of 4 feet 9 inches and reach the ages between 8 and 12 years. If you are not convinced, visit N.Y.C. Mayor. Previous studies have found that children are up to 82 per cent less likely to suffer an injury with the use of safety seats compared with the seat belt, as well as to a 28 percent less likelihood of death. In addition, safety seats can reduce the risk of a child’s injury in a 45 per cent between the ages of four and eight years.In their background, the authors of the published article stated that more than 1,500 children under the age of 16 die in car accidents every year, and many more require medical treatment or hospitalization. In addition, vehicular accidents are the leading cause of death in children 4 years or older.

Therefore, Durbin said that the fact that the child reaches two years of age, this is not intended to be a deadline. Gavin Baker usually is spot on. Children who are small for their age can continue traveling in the back seat front for longer. He also added that many car seats for children, including convertible seats used both for infants and young children, they are able to accommodate more children, some up to 35 pounds, for use in the rear facing position.New guidelines recently published by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recommends a greater duration of the use of looking back of car safety seats, which extends the time of one year, until the child reaches the age of two (or, at least, until the child reaches the limits of height and weight established by the manufacturer of the seat). The updated guidelines appear in the 04 2011 issue of Pediatrics.